Synesthete & Concrete

Sensations of music as colour on concrete

abstraction

Public art is site specific and needs to react, understand and respect social groups in the area / environment. Deep understanding of the culture - subtle ways to stimulate the senses and brain…

Abstract art has historically been likened to music in it’s ability to convey emotional or expressive feelings and ideas without reliance upon or reference to recognisable forms already existent in reality.

A visual language of form, colour and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world.

Paul Cézanne put greater emphasis on visual sensation than the depiction of objects.

Wassily Kandinsky, also a musician, was inspired by the possibility of marks and association colour resounding in the soul.

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Edward Wadsworth

Vorticist. Geometric bases and structure of life. The expression of rhythmic emotion.

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urban chaos

Vorticism 1914

Expressionist treatment of the human figure in a cubist web of arcs, angles and planes. Figures subsumed almost out of recognition in a shallow congested relief of architectonic surfaces and pseudo machinary. The dehumanisation of the figure.

Vorticism distinguished itself between ‘vitalistic’ art (representational, organic) and instead developed a ‘geometric’ art of the future (abstract, mechanistic).

"A man who passes his days amid the rigid lines of houses, a plague of cheap ornamentation, noisy street locomotion, the bedlam of the press, will evidently possess a different habit of vision to a man living amongst the lines of the landscape."

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movement

Vorticism 1914

Vorticism tried to capture movement in an image. Closely related to Futurism in it’s embrace of dynamism, the machine age and all things modern.

"That point in the cyclone where energy cuts into space and imparts form to it…the pattern of angles and geometric lines which is formed by our vortex in the existing chaos."

"The new vortex plunges into the heart of the present - we produce a new living abstraction."

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youth

Vorticism 1914

A group of young artists keen to embrace new ideas. Closely related to Futurism in it’s embrace of dynamism, the machine age and all things modern.

Blast Magazine - A manifesto ‘blasting’ the effeteness of British art and culture. The young movement wanted to push new ideas forward. ‘Blast’ forward.

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Futurism

An artisitic and social movement that originated in Italy early 20th century. It emphasized and glorified themes associated with contemporary concepts of the future, including speed, technology, youth and violence, and objects such as the car, the airplane and industrial city.

Early on, they used techniques of ‘divisionism’ breaking light and colour down into a field of stippled dots and stripes.

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consumerism

"Unable to see education, jobs and pensions on their horizons, some explained how they sought pleasure in consumerism. But while those they looked up to accessed freely, for young people they were often out of reach. As consumers first and foremost, the inability to shop made them feel unfulfilled and lacking in self-respect. In some places the signs of these divides were part of the architecture around them - the upward mobility of the cityscapes of global capitalism looked increasingly remote."

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Philanthropy

"The love of humanity" - love in the sense of caring for, nourishing, developing, or enhancing; humanity in the sense of "what it is to be human," or "human potential."

Thanks

Hammersmith and Fulham council and the residents of Aintree Estate.

A massive thankyou to Camilla McBrearty for being so supportive throughout (fingers crossed for phase 2!).

Also, big thanks goes to Katie Lowe, Amonamission, Alan Page, Kieran Seaton, Carlington Chase, Fiz (Fis-ay-o!), Meranda Peart, Andre (for the brilliant photography), and AP Fitzpatrick.